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Environmental Science Systems


The Environmental Science Systems (formerly called Natural Systems Science) major, administered through the Department of Biological Sciences, emphasizes a multidisciplinary, or systems, approach to global ecosystems and environmental issues.  Students must recognize that Earth’s biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere operate in complexly linked systems in which various components are exchanged over greatly varying time scales. Only through investigation and working toward a fuller awareness of these interactions can scientists hope to achieve an understanding of the causes and dimensions of global change, both natural and anthropogenic.

The impact of global change on the atmospheric, ecologic and hydrologic systems of Earth will be magnified in the near future as human population, and the resultant demand for resources, reaches new heights. Consequently,  there is a growing demand for professionals trained in the application of systems science to research problems in the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Therefore, the next generation of scientists and policy makers, in effect the future stewards of the Earth, must be trained with an awareness of the scope and magnitude of the problems and the systems approach to their study.           

Students have the opportunity to gain field research experience in their very first year through the introductory courses that travel to Arizona or Costa Rica. Additional field and/or laboratory experiences are acquired through conducting independent research projects on such topics as soil composition and structure, carbon cycling, ecological effects of climate change, or forest succession. The laboratory facilities at Le Moyne feature modern instruments, including advanced optical and electron microscopes, an X-ray diffractometer and a carbon/nitrogen analyzer for soils and rocks. These facilities are open to student use, both in laboratory courses and independent research projects. Faculty members in natural systems, biology and chemistry serve as mentors for majors conducting their research projects. In addition, students are encouraged to seek internships with local environmental and biotech companies.     

The major in Environmental Science Systems can be completed without a concentration, or with one of two pre-engineering concentrations, environmental engineering, and environmental engineering sciences. These concentrations are designed to prepare students for graduate study in environmental engineering and differ in the math and major elective requirements. Both concentrations involve coursework taken at the L.C. Smith College of Engineering at Syracuse University. Direct admission to the graduate program at the L.C. Smith College is possible if GPA requirements are met.

Le Moyne College also offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Studies. Information on this major can be obtained by clicking here.                                                                                                             

 

See video clips of Le Moyne trips on YouTube!

Iceland

1) The group doing ecological research at Skaftafell National Park.

2) A visit to the Jokulsarlon (Glacier Lagoon).

3. Watching puffins on Heimaey.

4. On the tuff cone at Hverfjall.

5. Our visit to Myvatn (and how it got that name).

6. The Laki lava flows.

7. Gulfoss waterfall.

Costa Rica

8. Avalanche on Arenal volcano.

9. Spider monkey near EARTH University.

10. Mudpot at Rincon de la Vieja.

11. Futbol on the beach