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Business Analytics

Our Alumni

Our business analytics (previously applied management analysis, or A.M.A.) students have gone on to succeed in many different fields of work, and they have cited the skills and knowledge gained from their studies as the main reasons that they were offered their positions. Click on the names of our recent graduates to read their testimonials:

Our graduates have gone on to work at companies such as:

Our graduates have also gone on to graduate school including:

  • University of Buffalo Law School
  • University of Connecticut School of Business

 

Occupations and Job Prospects

The following is a listing of occupations for business analytics majors. The information is from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The wages provided here are the May 2011 National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates.

Industrial Production Managers (Occupation code: 11-3051): Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
Average wage: $96,370 ($46.33 per hour).
Median wage: $88,190 ($42.40 per hour).
10th percentile wage: $53,130 ($25.54 per hour).
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 9%.

Purchasing Managers (Occupation code: 11-3061): Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of buyers, purchasing officers, and related workers involved in purchasing materials, products, and services. Includes wholesale or retail trade merchandising managers and procurement managers.
Average wage: $103,110 ($49.57 per hour)
Median wage: $97,130 ($46.70 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $55,680 ($26.77 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 7%

Transportation, Storage, and Distribution Managers (Occupation code: 11-3071): Plan, direct, or coordinate transportation, storage, or distribution activities in accordance with organizational policies and applicable government laws or regulations. Includes logistics managers.
Average wage: $87,830 ($42.23 per hour)
Median wage: $80,860 ($38.87 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $47,800 ($22.98 per hour)

General and Operations Managers (Occupation code: 11-1021): Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services.
Average wage: $114,490 ($55.04 per hour)
Median wage: $95,150 ($45.74 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $47,580 ($22.87 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 5%

Wholesale and Retail Buyers (Occupation code: 13-1022): Buy merchandise or commodities, other than farm products, for resale to consumers at the wholesale or retail level, including both durable and nondurable goods. Analyze past buying trends, sales records, price, and quality of merchandise to determine value and yield. Select, order, and authorize payment for merchandise according to contractual agreements. May conduct meetings with sales personnel and introduce new products. Includes assistant wholesale and retail buyers of nonfarm products.
Average wage: $56,810 ($27.31 per hour)
Median wage: $50,490 ($24.27 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $29,570 ($14.21 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 7%

Purchasing Agents (Occupation code: 13-1023): Purchase machinery, equipment, tools, parts, supplies, or services necessary for the operation of an establishment. Purchase raw or semi-finished materials for manufacturing.
Average wage: $61,280 ($29.46 per hour)
Median wage: $57,580 ($27.68 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $35,640 ($17.13 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 7%

Logisticians (Occupation code: 13-1081): Analyze and coordinate the logistical functions of a firm or organization. Responsible for the entire life cycle of a product, including acquisition, distribution, internal allocation, delivery, and final disposal of resources.
Average wage: $74,860 ($35.99 per hour)
Median wage: $71,910 ($34.57 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $44,830 ($21.55 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 26%

Management Analysts (Occupation code: 13-1111): Conduct organizational studies and evaluations, design systems and procedures, conduct work simplification and measurement studies, and prepare operations and procedures manuals to assist management in operating more efficiently and effectively. Includes program analysts and management consultants.
Average wage: $87,980 ($42.3 per hour)
Median wage: $78,490 ($37.74 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $43,920 ($21.12 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 22%

Market Research Analysts (Occupation code: 13-1161): Research market conditions in local, regional, or national areas, or gather information to determine potential sales of a product or service, or create a marketing campaign. May gather information on competitors, prices, sales, and methods of marketing and distribution.
Average wage: $67,130 ($32.27 per hour)
Median wage: $60,250 ($28.97 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $33,490 ($16.10 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 41%

Budget Analysts (Occupation code: 13-2031): Examine budget estimates for completeness, accuracy, and conformance with procedures and regulations. Analyze budgeting and accounting reports.
Average wage: $71,450 ($34.35 per hour)
Median wage: $69,090 ($33.22 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $45,360 ($21.81 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 10%

Credit Analysts (Occupation code: 13-2041): Analyze credit data and financial statements of individuals or firms to determine the degree of risk involved in extending credit or lending money. Prepare reports with credit information for use in decision making.
Average wage: $69,640 ($33.48 per hour)
Median wage: $60,730 ($29.20 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $36,590 ($17.59 per hour)

Financial Analysts (Occupation code: 13-2051): Conduct quantitative analyses of information affecting investment programs of public or private institutions.
Average wage: $87,740 ($42.18 per hour)
Median wage: $75,650 ($36.37 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $46,300 ($22.26 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 23%

Computer Systems Analysts (Occupation code: 15-1121): Analyze science, engineering, business, and other data processing problems to implement and improve computer systems. Analyze user requirements, procedures, and problems to automate or improve existing systems and review computer system capabilities, workflow, and scheduling limitations. May analyze or recommend commercially available software.
Average wage: $82,320 ($39.58 per hour)
Median wage: $78,770 ($37.87 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $49,370 ($23.74 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 22%

Operations Research Analysts (Occupation code: 15-2031): Formulate and apply mathematical modeling and other optimizing methods to develop and interpret information that assists management with decision making, policy formulation, or other managerial functions. May collect and analyze data and develop decision support software, service, or products. May develop and supply optimal time, cost, or logistics networks for program evaluation, review, or implementation.
Average wage: $78,840 ($37.90 per hour)
Median wage: $71,950 ($34.59 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $40,620 ($19.53 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 15%

Statisticians (Occupation code: 15-2041): Formulate and apply mathematical modeling and other optimizing methods to develop and interpret information that assists management with decision making, policy formulation, or other managerial functions. May collect and analyze data and develop decision support software, service, or products. May develop and supply optimal time, cost, or logistics networks for program evaluation, review, or implementation.
Average wage: $78,840 ($37.90 per hour)
Median wage: $71,950 ($34.59 per hour)
10th percentile wage: $40,620 ($19.53 per hour)
Job growth rate (2010-2020): 15%

 

Testimonials

Randall Bittel '09, Branch Analyst, Solvay Bank

Starting off at Le Moyne as a finance major, I quickly realized how well finance and business analytics complemented each other. After I took statistics and the intro to business analytics courses, I decided to do the finance and business analytics dual major, and I'm glad I did. The way the courses are taught, in computer labs using workbooks that are easy to follow, really allows the student to gain valuable skills that can be applied in a career after Le Moyne. In fact, I still use the business analytics workbooks today as a reference when building Excel models.

The skills I have acquired through the business analytics major are not skills I could have gotten with any other major or even at some other colleges. I have friends who graduated from other colleges with degrees in business that have told me they wished they had the opportunity to learn how to utilize Excel like I have. The "Consultants to Emerging Enterprises course" was a great way to apply the knowledge and skills I acquired through my studies at Le Moyne in a real-world setting. As part of a small team of students, we were assigned to work with a local small business and to analyze its operations and offer suggestions to the owner(s) based upon you analysis. These recommendations can have a lasting impact on the enterprise and help it emerge as a profitable business for years to come.

My business analytics background has helped me get my career started. I currently am a Branch Analyst for Solvay Bank, a community bank that has served Onondaga County for over 95 years. I use what I learned as a business analytics student everyday, as well as to build a forecast model for sales and a teller staffing model to make our branches run more efficiently. Prior to working at Solvay Bank, I was an Operations Analyst for Citi where I utilized my acquired skills to help make one of the world's largest financial institutions run more efficiently and effectively.

 

Sean Johnson '09, Revenue Officer, Internal Revenue Service

I can't imagine a more valuable major in preparing a student for life after graduation than applied management analysis. There isn't another major out there that can set students up for success in so many different fields. A.M.A. is more than just data analysis or financial analysis; it's about finding solutions to problems beneath the surface. My time studying A.M.A. trained me to think logically as well as systematically.

As a revenue officer for the Internal Revenue Service, I use what I learned in A.M.A. daily at work. Whether I'm analyzing the finances of an individual or determining the ability of a business to make a profit, I am able to apply aspects of A.M.A. to everything I do. One thing that has stood out to me is how much I value obtaining financial information and statements from taxpayers. By using what I learned studying A.M.A., I'm able to put that information to use in ways that other people cannot, giving me a significant advantage in the workplace.

A.M.A. has such a practical use that there isn't a field out there to which it wouldn't apply, and as a student I loved each A.M.A. class I had. They gave me an opportunity to learn something that I knew would help me in the future, and it has aided me in my development as a professional and individual. I would recommend A.M.A. as a major to any prospective business student who is interested in making a difference in the business environment.

 

Steven Kozlowski '10, Credit Union Examiner, National Credit Union Administration

Steven is currently pursuing his Ph.D. at the University of Connecticut School of Business.

I came to Le Moyne College as a freshman in 2006 knowing that I wanted to go into the field of finance, but not knowing specifically what I would like to do. After taking AMA 301 as a sophomore, I knew right away that I would add it as a second major. I sincerely enjoyed working on the problems that were assigned as part of the course work. I did not know that I would wind up adding M.I.S. as a third major, but that's another story.

Currently, I work for the National Credit Union Administration as a credit union examiner, and I definitely see how the education that I received as an A.M.A. major has provided me with skills that translate into "real world" success. Certainly the ability to analyze financial trends and assess the risk of a particular business decision has proven to be quite valuable in my case because that is a large part of my job. However, the ability to put together a report that clearly articulates the optimal solution to a problem, and the ability to effectively articulate that solution in a formal presentation, may be the greatest things that I have gained from my A.M.A. experience.

In my experience, every A.M.A. course that I took at Le Moyne was interesting and beneficial. Overall, I attribute a lot of my marketability to the knowledge and skills that I gained from these courses. I definite would recommend an A.M.A. major to anyone who is considering going into business.

 

Elizabeth Rhode '12, Managed Accounts Representative, Cadaret, Grant & Co., Inc.

It wasn't until after graduating from Le Moyne that I truly was able to appreciate my knowledge and background in business analytics. All undergrads carry the fear of not having a job after college, and of having no way to keep up with those not-so-fun student loans. So having a marketable skill-set to employers is vital. For me, business analytics was a major contributor for landing my first job, the one I am currently in now.

I was able to get my first job in a training program with a local broker/dealer in Syracuse. I remember bringing Excel spreadsheets from different business analytics classes I had taken into my first interview. I was able to market myself to my future employer using my knowledge of financial analysis, and my employer was really interested in seeing what I could do with Excel.

After graduating, I began working in the training program and moved between various departments, learning about the finance industry, and about the company I work for. Knowing how to work in Excel provided me with so many advantages than if I had not. I was able to work on projects that ran simulations for possible structure changes, and without understanding Excel, I would have been lost.

Not only did majoring in business analytics provide me with a greater understanding of Excel, and the tools for financial analysis, but it also improved my team work and public presentation skills. Many of the projects done in business analytics require students to work in groups. Students must collaborate on how to produce results, such as cost savings simulations and risk analysis, while also working together to develop written papers and presentations. These projects and presentations were graded on the terms that the students were in fact in the work environment. Professional appearance and presentation were graded heavily. I believe these classes greatly helped me prepare for what I'd face in the real world.

As a graduate dual-majoring in finance and business analytics, I strongly suggest any potential business major to look into business analytics as a possibility. If I had to choose again, I would undoubtedly still choose business analytics.

 

Alexandra Gurley '13, Supply Chain Analyst, St. Joseph's Hospital

One of the most marketable majors at Le Moyne, business analytics taught me how to create solutions to common problems found in every type of business. The analytical strategies that I have learned always take into account the bigger picture: the contexts and situations in which problems occur. Although I hold minors in three other disciplines, only business analytics taught me this type of precise and holistic reasoning.

Every day I use the advanced analytical methods that I have learned in my job at St. Joseph's Hospital, where I work in the Supply Chain division. Sometimes that means creating spreadsheets to simulate potential cost savings, while other times it means interpreting the ripple effect of those savings.

Although business analytics helps me immensely in my current job, the skills I learned are applicable in a wide range of fields and career pursuits. I will use the knowledge that I have gained wherever my future takes me.