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  • Lawrence Tanner

    Lawrence Tanner

    Professor

    Science Center Addition 210
    Le Moyne College
    1419 Salt Springs Road
    Syracuse, NY 13214


    PHONE:

    (315) 445-4537


    EMAIL


    Director, Center for the Study of Environmental Change
    Director, Environmental Science Systems
    Director, Environmental Studies

    Education

    • PhD (1990) University of Massachusetts at Amherst
    • MS (1980) University of Tulsa
    • BA (1978) Williams College

    Courses Taught

    • BSC 110: Paleobiology of Dinosaurs
    • ESS 121: Global Resources
    • ESS 128: Global Ecosystems - Costa Rica
    • ESS 129: Global Ecosystems - North America
    • ESS 205: Physical Geology
    • ESS 238: Earth-History and Inhabitants
    • BIO 237: Ecology of the Galapagos
    • ESS 320: Earth’s Surface
    • BIO/ESS 348: Environmental Research - Iceland
    • BIO/ESS 458: Global Climate Systems

    Research Interests

    Much of my work focuses on the paleogeography and paleoclimate of the Mesozoic world (probably a consequence of my childhood fascination with dinosaurs). My current research in this area examines the environmental conditions (climatic, atmospheric, etc.) as dinosaurs rose to ascendancy in the Late Triassic, the record and causes of extinctions for the early Mesozoic, and the global environmental processes responsible for mass extinctions in general. Primarily, this research is conducted through field studies (sedimentology and stratigraphy) of early Mesozoic formations in the Four Corners area and the Canadian Maritimes.

    A secondary interest is in volcanology, particularly the recognition of volcanic processes through the study of volcanoclastic deposits. Most of my work in this area has been concentrated on the volcanoes of southern Italy (Etna, Stromboli and the Iblean Plateau of Sicily), where I have worked for some years with Dr. Sonia Calvari of the INGV in Catania, Sicily. I am also deeply interested in the effects on the climate and environment of large-scale volcanic eruptions, such as those of large igneous provinces.

    Most importantly, I have passionate concern for the rapidly changing environment of our Earth. The realization that modern climate change and habitat loss are already having a significant impact on ecology drives my research with Le Moyne students investigating changes in soil and forest structure and carbon cycle dynamics in such diverse locations as Iceland and Costa Rica. I encourage solidarity between environmental action groups and faith traditions in addressing these concerns.

    Please see my personal webpage for a listing of 90+ publications, most of which are available on ResearchGate.


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