Men and Women for Others

A Le Moyne education encourages students to integrate contemplation and action, so they become men and women with well­-developed minds, generous hearts and reflective souls - “agents of change” who work to bring about a more just, humane world.


Commitment to Service

Service is more than “the right thing to do.” It’s what makes us human, makes us whole. As a Le Moyne student, service will be woven into everything you do, from the community project in your history or English class to the afternoon you spend serving dinner at a local soup kitchen. Learn more

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consecte adipiscing elit. An Alternative Break

Many Le Moyne students use their breaks a little differently.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consecte adipiscing elit. DIVING Right In

Giving back begins as soon as students arrive on campus.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consecte adipiscing elit. More than PB&J

The "Sandwich Makers" fill bellies and nourish spirits.

The Jesuits – A History Five Centuries in the Making

Video

Ever since St. Ignatius of Loyola established the Society of Jesus in 1534, the Jesuits have focused much of their efforts on education and service to others. As envisioned by its founder, Jesuits and their lay collaborators seek to “find God in all things,” dedicated to the tenet of cura personalis – the care and development of the whole person, mind, body and soul. Learn more


Commitment to Social Justice
In the classroom and beyond, social justice is at the core of all that we do at Le Moyne. It is the fabric of our Jesuit identity. As a student, you will learn to think for yourself and about others, asking questions about the world in which we live – and the one you want to inherit. Learn more
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consecte adipiscing elit. Standing with Ferguson

Members of the Le Moyne community gathered in solidarity with the citizens of Ferguson, Mo.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consecte adipiscing elit. Marching for Mother Earth

Students and faculty join 400,000 others from around the world to rally for the planet.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consecte adipiscing elit. Honoring the Martyrs

Celebrating the lives of the Jesuit martyrs of El Salvador, 25 years later.

"At what other school would you be encouraged to establish a program to aid the homeless while pursuing your MBA? This is such a testament to the Jesuit mission that I was allowed to undertake this project as part of my classwork. I will forever be grateful for that." - Kate Waltman, ’13, MBA ’16, founder Step Up Moment

Hear her Story
Speaking Jesuit 101
Ignatian
St. Ignatius Statue

This refers to aspects of the spirituality initiated by Ignatius and the Jesuits that are applicable for all people. 

Le Moyne Dolphins

Latin for “more,” this is the challenge to strive for excellence.

Cura Personalis

This Latin term means “care for the individual person” and describes respect for the dignity of each person as a child of God. It leads to the teacher involving the student in the process of learning and expressing personal care for each individual.

Educating the whole person

Peter­-Hans Kolvenbach, S.J., a recent superior general of the Society of Jesus, said that Jesuit schools should “educate the whole person of solidarity for the real world.” This translates to learning through contact, not just concepts: first­-hand experience, service­-learning, outreach.

Finding God in All things

Those at Jesuit institutions should seek to find God in all things — divine revelation, the natural world, human experience and every academic discipline that explores these orders of knowledge. This active discernment can lead to spiritual development made possible by the liberal arts ideal of studying a broad spectrum of topics to have a sense of the unity of knowledge.

For others

Coined by Pedro Arrupe, S.J., who’s considered the founder of the modern, post­-Vatican II Society of Jesus, this phrase speaks to the heart of the Jesuit tradition: We must become “people who cannot even conceive of love of God which does not include love for the least of their neighbors.” A Jesuit education encourages students to integrate contemplation and action, so they become men and women with well­-developed minds, generous hearts and reflective souls — “agents of change” who work to bring about a more just, humane world.

— Information from “Do You Speak Ignatian?” by George W. Traub, S.J.

St. Ignatius

After recovering, he traveled to the monastery of Montserrat near Barcelona, and there dedicated himself to the service of God. His conversion was deepened through ten months of prayer at Manresa, a town about ten miles away. There he experienced visions and anxieties, joys and scruples, and learned to discern the difference between the workings of God and those of the evil spirit. In mystical visions beyond words, Ignatius experienced the love of the Trinity communicating itself to us and acting within creation out of love for us. He began to free himself from anything holding him back from God. And he greatly desired to share his experience of God with others.

Excerpt from manresa – sj.org