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Faculty Publications
The Asian Miracle, Myth, and Mirage: The Economic Slowdown is Here to Stay
Dr. Bernard  Arogyaswamy
Professor of Business Administration
Business Department


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Until recently, double-digit economic growth was not unusual among Asian countries and, in fact, had come to be expected of them. From western India to northeastern China, markets were booming and incredible numbers of foreign investors were racing into the Asian markets. Scholars have written laudatory books and articles, politicians want to ensure that trade with Asian countries continues on a rising trajectory, and business leaders have become the new promoters of Asian prosperity. This book attempts to inject a note of caution and reality, while giving Asian countries well-deserved credit for improving their economic status.</p> <p>Technological, managerial, and institutional deficiencies need to be addressed in Asian countries if the progress of the past two decades is to be restored and preserved. Although Asian nations, particularly Japan, have invested heavily in R&D, their success mainly derives from process improvements and not from new product innovations. Technology and science are the foundations of modern economic civilization, and Asia's assets fall behind Western countries in both areas. The centrality of family-based organizations in some Asian economies and the dependence on horizontal/vertical networks in others also limits the ability of Asian firms to become global operations. The lack of adequate institutions such as an independent judiciary and a responsive polity, and the absence of organizations to bridge the gap between familism and the government, results in an uncertain societal framework in much of Asia. If robust economic growth is to return, Asian economies must rectify the weaknesses Arogyaswamy exposes in this provocative and timely book.



"Stalwart Women" A Historical Analysis of Deans of Women in the South
Dr. Carolyn Terry  Bashaw
Professor
History Department


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This innovative study provides a close examination of the accomplishments of four women who served as Deans of Women in co-educational institutions, a once crucial but now defunct role. Focusing on Southern colleges rather than traditionally elite institutions, the author begins with each woman's retirement and looks back at their fascinating lives of achievement, spirit, and strength. She explores how these pioneers influenced the quality of women's lives on campus by facing such challenges as the Great Depression and the lack of athletic and housing facilities for female students. Moreover, Bashaw reveals how these deans were concerned with the lives of women beyond the classroom and sought to prepare their students for enriching lives after college. These compelling portraits are based on personal letters, anecdotes, and archives that allow Bashaw to draw new conclusions that shake the dust from previously held notions about the function of women in university administration. With appeal to those in the fields of Women's History, and the History of Education, at both the graduate and undergraduate levels, this groundbreaking volume illuminates the enduring impact and legacy of the female dean.

 

 

 



A Caring Jurisprudence: Listening to Patients at the Supreme Court
Dr. Susan M.  Behuniak
Professor
Political Science Department


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In deciding the abortion and physician assisted suicide cases, a majority of the Justices of the United States Supreme Court drew on medical knowledge to inform their opinions while dismissing the distinctively different knowledge offered by patients.

Following the legal norms derived from the ethic of justice, the Court's deference toward the "universal," "impartial," and "reasoned" knowledge of the medical profession and its disregard of the "particular," "involved," and "emotional" knowledge of patients seemed inevitable as well as justified. But was it?

This book argues that it is both possible and proper to develop a jurisprudence capable of incorporating the knowledge of patients. This book proposes a model for a "caring jurisprudence" that integrates the ethic of justice and the ethic of care to ensure that patients' knowledge is included in judicial decision making.

 

 

 

 



The Matriarchs of England's Cooperative Movement: A Study in Gender Politics and Female Leadership, 1883-1921
Dr. Barbara J.   Blaszak
Professor
History Department


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Current thinking considers the Women's Cooperative Guild within the English Cooperative Movement to have been an independent and democratically run organization whose leaders built sisterhood across class lines and achieved many benefits for married working-class women. This study of the dynamics of gender within the movement between 1883 and 1921 arrives at different conclusions. Blaszak examines what freedoms of speech and activity women were permitted within the movement, as well as what resources they were given to accomplish their tasks. Ultimately, the parameters set by the men would determine the type of female leadership that emerged and whether it was able to realize its feminist and utopian agendas.

 

 



Included in Sociology
Dr. Jeffrey  Chin
Professor of Sociology
Sociology and Anthropology Department
Carnegie National Scholar


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Included in Sociology is a practice-oriented monograph written by sociology faculty for their colleagues and others who care about the retention and success of students of color, especially in the discipline's gateway courses.</p></p> <p><p>Examines assumptions about diversity and teaching/learning, and provides strategies for enacting learning environments that are more inclusive and conducive to the success of all students.

A resource for conversation and action in individual classrooms, departments, and in the discipline.

Published in cooperation with the American Sociological Association.

 



Marketing Your Church: Concepts and Strategies
Dr. John J.   Considine
Professor
Business Administration Department


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For pastors and parish councils to develop and evaluate their strategies of marketing of the parish. Helpful, practical, and common-sense wisdom that will increase your visibility.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



"Ordinary Language Criticism: Literary Thinking after Cavell after Wittgenstein"
Dr. William  Day
Assistant Professor
Philosophy Department


ed. Kenneth Dauber and Walter Jost, Northwestern University Press Includes William Day, "Moonstruck, or How to Ruin Everything"

A major intervention into the question of the uses of literature, Ordinary Language Criticism proposes a radical paradigm shift away from the kinds of literary criticism that have dominated the academy for the last two decades and more. In a series of essays on texts and figures ranging from Genesis to Don Quixote to Proust, Henry James, Heidegger, and Frost, an eminent group of literary critics and philosophers sets out to recover "ordinariness" as the overlooked point of departure in literary studies and to point up the aesthetic, ethical, and metaphysical consequences that follow from that recovery.



"Collective Bargaining in American Industry: Contemporary Perspectives and Future Directions"
Dr. Cliff  Donn
Professor
Industrial Relations/Human Resource Management Department


(edited with David B. Lipsky) Lexington Books



"The Australian Council of Trade Unions: Hisory and Economic Policy"
Dr. Cliff  Donn
Professor
Industrial Relations/Human Resource Management Department


University Press of America



Rebels, Reformers, & Revolutionaries: Collected Essays and Second Thoughts
Dr. Douglas R.   Egerton
Professor
History Department


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This collection of essays examines the lives and thoughts of three interrelated Southern groups - enslaved rebels, conservative white reformers, and white revolutionaries -presenting a clear and cogent understanding of race, reform, and conservatism in early American history.

 

 

 

 



Modified Rapture: Comedy in W.S. Gilbert's Savoy Operas
Dr. Alan  Fischler
Professor
English Department


published by University Press of Virginia, Victorian Literature and Culture Series, 1991</p> <p>Dr. Fischler also contributed to the following books:

“Dion Boucicault,” forthcoming in the Grolier Encyclopedia of the Victorian Era, ed. Thomas Pendergast.

“Gilbert and Sullivan,” forthcoming in the Grolier Encyclopedia of the Victorian Era.

"Drama," Chapter in A Companion to Victorian Literature &amp; Culture, ed. Herbert F. Tucker (Oxford: Blackwell, 1999), pp. 339-355.

"Douglas Jerrold," A biographical essay published in the Dictionary of Literary Biography: British Reform Writers, 1789-1832, 1996, pp. 169-176.

"Herrick's Holy Hedonism," selected for inclusion in Poetry Criticism, ed. Drew Kalasky (Gale Research, 1994), pp. 140-44. Reprinted from Modern Language Studies, 1983.

 



Solutions Manual for Physical Chemistry
Dr. Carmen  Giunta
Associate Professor
Chemistry Department


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These two works are supplements to Physical Chemistry by Peter Atkins. Atkins’ text is one of the most widely used for teaching physical chemistry. The manuals are published by Oxford University Press, and distributed in North America by W. H. Freeman and Co. Between them the solutions manuals include detailed solutions of all the problems and exercises in the textbook. Dr. Giuna's co-authors of the manuals are: Peter Atkins, professor of chemistry at Oxford University and author of the main textbook as well, Charles Trapp, professor of chemistry at University of Louisville, and Marshall Cady, associate professor of chemistryn at Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN. In addition to writing solutions for the solutions manual, Giunta and Trapp wrote about 100 new problems for the 6th edition of the textbook. These exercises introduce students to some recently published research in physical chemistry. Giunta also wrote the Web based supplement to the textbook for W. H. Freeman.

The new editions of the Solutions Manuals were published by Oxford University Press in 2002



Slavery in Early Christianity
Dr. Jennifer  Glancy
Professor
Religious Studies Department


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Slavery was widespread throughout the Mediterranean lands where Christianity was born and developed. Though Christians were both slaves and slaveholders, there has been surprisingly little study of what early Christians thought about the realities of slavery. How did they reconcile slavery with the Gospel teachings of brotherhood and charity? Slaves were considered the sexual property of their owners: what was the status within the Church of enslaved women and young male slaves who were their owners' sexual playthings? Is there any reason to believe that Christians shied away from the use of corporal punishments so common among ancient slave owners? Jennifer A. Glancy brings a multilayered approach to these and many other issues, offering a comprehensive re-examination of the evidence pertaining to slavery in early Christianity. Drawing on a wide variety of sources, Glancy situates early Christian slavery in its broader cultural setting. She argues that scholars have consistently underestimated the pervasive impact of slavery on the institutional structures, ideologies, and practices of the early churches and of individual Christians. The churches, she shows, grew to maturity with the assumption that slaveholding was the norm, and welcomed both slaves and slaveholders as members. Glancy draws attention to the importance of the body in the thought and practice of ancient slavery. To be a slave was to be a body subject to coercion and violation, with no rights to corporeal integrity or privacy. Even early Christians who held that true slavery was spiritual in nature relied, ultimately, on bodily metaphors to express this. Slavery, Glancy demonstrates, was an essential feature of both the physical and metaphysical worlds of early Christianity. The first book devoted to the early Christian ideology and practice of slavery, this work sheds new light on the world of the ancient Mediterranean and on the development of the early Church.

Additional Book Credits

Introduction to the Study of Religion
Dr. Jennifer  Glancy
Professor
Religious Studies Department


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This introductory text helps students think through the basic questions that arise in the study of religion. What is the nature of religious experience? How does religion shape the actions of individuals and communities? How does religion promote or inhibit human development and well-being?

Developed and tested through team teaching and refined and revised through classroom use, Introduction to the Study of Religion brings together examples from a variety of world religions to explore these questions. Each chapter contains illustrations and sidebars that relate more abstract concepts to the student's life experience as well as study/research activities, suggested readings, and audiovisual resources. The final chapter explores current issues such as patriarchy, alienating images of God, religion in the face of suffering, and cults. A glossary of terms used throughout the text is included.

This book is currently in its fourth printing.

 

 

 



Living Responsibly in Community Essays in Honor of E. Clinton Gardner
Dr. Fred  Glennon
Associate Professor
Religious Studies Department


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These essays critically appropriate the concepts of responsibility and covenant by reconceptualizing them within diverse Christian ethical traditions (virtue ethics, feminist ethics, African-American) and by discerning their implications for critical social issues, including abortion, law, medicine, public policy, and technology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Book Credits

Introduction to the Study of Religion
Dr. Fred  Glennon
Associate Professor
Religious Studies Department


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This introductory text helps students think through the basic questions that arise in the study of religion. What is the nature of religious experience? How does religion shape the actions of individuals and communities? How does religion promote or inhibit human development and well-being?

Developed and tested through team teaching and refined and revised through classroom use, Introduction to the Study of Religion brings together examples from a variety of world religions to explore these questions. Each chapter contains illustrations and sidebars that relate more abstract concepts to the student's life experience as well as study/research activities, suggested readings, and audiovisual resources. The final chapter explores current issues such as patriarchy, alienating images of God, religion in the face of suffering, and cults. A glossary of terms used throughout the text is included.

This book is currently in its fourth printing.

 

 



Shipboard Automatic Identification System Displays: Meeting the Needs of Mariners
Dr. Martha  Grabowski
Department Chair
Information Systems Department


The final report of a 24-month National Academies/National Research Council study for the U.S. Coast Guard, Transportation Safety Administration assessing the technical and human factors aspects of shipboard display of automatic identification systems information. Dr. Grabowski chaired the National Research Council committee. The report will provide the basis for U.S. Coast Guard regulations on AIS for domestic waterborne vessels, as well as the U.S. position on AIS technology at the United Nations' International Maritime Organization meetings in 2003-2005.



A Hard and Bitter Peace A Global History of the Cold War
Dr. Edward  Judge
Professor
History Department


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Focusing on personalities as well as events, this book presents a lively, comprehensible history of world affairs between 1945 and 1991. A HARD AND BITTER PEACE explains not only what happened, but why things happened as they did, and how they were related to each other. Beginning with the origins of the Cold War and ending with the collapse of the Soviet Union, Judge and Langdon present a penetrating analysis of the superpower confrontation that fascinated and frightened the world.

From the Berlin Blockade to the destruction of the Berlin Wall, from Suez Crisis to Cuban Missile Crisis, from Korean War to Gulf War, the authors blend their descriptions of key events with vivid portrayals of the background and character of leading Cold War figures. A HARD AND BITTER PEACE provides both a gripping account of the rivalry between the Soviet Union and the United States and the global setting indispensable to a realistic evaluation of this turbulent period.

 

 



The Cold War: A History Through Documents
Dr. Edward  Judge
Professor
History Department


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The Collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 ended almost half a century of intense international struggle known as the Cold War. THE COLD WAR: A HISTORY THROUGH DOCUMENTS presents more than 130 speeches, agreements, statements, and texts from that turbulent era, covering topics such as the origins of the Cold War, the nuclear arms race, the U-2 affair, the Berlin Wall, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, the Sino-Soviet Split, and the end of the Cold War.

In this collection, the great events of the era come alive through the words and phrases of those who shaped them. The documents have been carefully edited and excerpted, with clear concise introductions providing the historical background and context. Whether you lived through the Cold War or have just begun to learn about it, you will find these documents an indispensable aid in understanding that pivotal period in modern world history.

 

 



The Ongoing Work of Jesus His Mission in Our Lives
James  Krisher
Member of Teaching Faculty
Religious Studies Department


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Our sense of mission is integral to our identity as God created us; it's rooted in who we are as unique individuals." In a clear, direct, and readable style Krisher invites us to meditate on the qualities or facets of Jesus' mission as described in Jesus' own words: a mission to sinners, a mission to serve, to give life, and to bring fire.

Also by James Krisher "Spiritual Surrender: Yielding Yourself to a Loving God" - Asserts that surrender is the fundamental life stance that undergirds all our choices. Reviews and dismisses the typical misconceptions of surrender, and focuses on surrender as a choice we make repeatedly no matter what the circumstance: in suffering, pleasure, joy, or prayer.

 

 



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